Green (with envy)

I’ve been think it over and I’ve realized that I’m seriously jealous of my future self. First of all, she’s crazy organized. She’s super accomplished, very well-read, and thoroughly adventurous. I’m mean, that woman really has it all together. I think she can probably salsa dance too. Wow.

Okay, enough of that. Back to editing.

Thursday Thoughts

This week month, my life is a seemingly endless pile of editing work and right now I’d rather being doing… well almost anything, else. (Like actually writing). “Writing” isn’t always fun, but it is what I’ve work for.

Writing with a Plan

Writing can be fun and spontaneous. But when I want to produce something worthwhile, fiction or otherwise, I tend to start with a significant outline. Without a plan, I could always luck out with a good story, but even if I do, the mountain of editing work isn’t worth it.

I know other writers who don’t outline their work at all. Instead they just pick it up and go. (How fun!) That’s great for them but it doesn’t work for me. By the time I sit down to “write,” I’m already weeks, months, or even years into the project.

 

Novel Challenge

Last February, I ambitiously challenged myself to produce an entire rough draft for a novel in 12 weeks. The time frame was essentially arbitrary, really I just imagined that 3 months fit nicely into my schedule. I had had the plot outlined for several months, just sitting around for a time when I could get it all out in one go. I started out strong.

Then life happened. (I know, like I couldn’t have seen that coming.)

And I can’t complain, it was good “life.” My first book got published, (wow!), and a novelette to boot. I really can’t complain. But I still have a half-manuscript, a wonky first draft it its most awkward form, waiting for my attention. So, I forget the 12 week delusion and I get back to the grindstone. 🙂

 

 

I’m Featured on Judy Penz Sheluk’s Blog

Author Name: Jennifer Berg Book Title: The Hatbox Murders Book Genre: Historical mystery Release Date: March 28, 2017 Synopsis: Seattle, 1956. Inspector Riggs doesn’t believe in “women’s intuition.” But when a sharp stenographer keeps insisting that her friend’s death was no … Continue reading →

via New Release Mondays: The Hatbox Murders by Jennifer Berg — Judy Penz Sheluk

Mystery Fans at Large

In 10+ years of trying to get published, I’ve received feedback from supportive friends and family. In the course of getting published, the feedback has been positive, constructive, and sometimes embarrassing. Now, that I’m published, my book just started receiving feedback from complete strangers — people who are in no way connected to me, the industry, or my publisher. Mystery fans are actually reading my stuff? WOW!

 

 

 

Why did I set my series the 1950s?

At the authors panel I attended earlier this month, we were asked why we had chosen to write mysteries in a specific era.

There areBooks by Jennifer Berg several reasons why I chose the 1950s, not all of them very interesting. But in short, it’s an era that had more colorful charm than grizzly forensics. Since I’m all about the puzzle of a good mystery, that works well for me. The 1950s had great fashion, textures, music, and it was a complicated time socially as everyone tried to create a normal — better — life after the war. Basically, there’s a lot for me to work with.

The challenge is the era’s rampant sexism and racism. Not a good thing. And while I’m not a huge history buff, I can’t simply gloss over the pieces I don’t like. Of course, I’m writing murder mysteries not social historical commentary, but I really do try to use social accuracy to enhance the story and the mystery part of the adventure, without making it so central as to distract the audience. (And I sincerely hope I’m doing a good job.)

After all, we’re reading mysteries to enjoy ourselves.

Mystery Mondays: Jennifer Berg On Being An Organized Writer

Source: Mystery Mondays: Jennifer Berg On Being An Organized Writer

Mystery Mondays: Jennifer Berg On Being An Organized Writer

I’m very lucky to be featured on author Kristina Stanley’s website!

KRISTINA STANLEY

Today on Mystery Mondays, we have Jennifer Berg, Author of The Hatbox Murders published by Barking Rain Press.

The Importance of Being Organized by Jennifer Berg

Writing can be a lot of fun, but my biggest tip for serious writing is to be organized. If you’re looking for a publisher, keep a log of all your leads, contacts, and submissions. When researching a book, keep extensive notes and have them organized in a way that works for you. Personally, I work from detailed plot outlines, and I take a few minutes each day (okay, most days) to log how many hours I spent on each project, and what sort of work I did (research, outlining, draft #1, 2, 3… editing, marketing, etc.).

Not only does this help me to realistically plan my workload, and keep my work-life balance in check, it’s also reassuring to watch the hours accumulate as…

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Historical Mystery Panel

Jennifer Berg after ACA panel, San Diego, CABooks by Jennifer Berg

Last week’s panel was a blast! I learned a lot, sold some books, and I got to meet two vastly diverse and talented historical mystery authors. M. Louisa Locke writes the Victorian San Francisco Mysteries. And Jeri Westerson writes the Crispin Guest Mysteries (among other things) which take place in Medieval England.

Both women were very friendly and supportive to me personally, as well as being all-round fascinating people. I was having so much fun listening and participating, that it was near the end when it suddenly dawned that I’d never met other historical mystery authors before. I’ve been writing mysteries alone for over 6 years, and I’m the only one I know who writes mysteries set in 1950s Seattle, but I’m not really a tribe of one. 🙂

And now my reading list has grown to include more great historical mysteries!

M. Louisa Locke               Jeri Westerson