The Hatbox Murders

by Jennifer BergHatboxCover

Barking Rain Press

Inspector Riggs reluctantly agrees to re-examine a supposed suicide case, but when his investigation leads to murder, he will have to convince a clever librarian to go undercover to catch the murderer.

Mystery Sub-Genres: Detective, Historical, Traditional, Amateur Sleuth, Soft-Boiled

Other Characteristics: Seattle, 1950’s, female sleuth

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Magnolia’s Fantasy Streets

When researching my 1950s era books, I’m always referring to my old Seattle map. A few weeks ago, I posted a map-mystery about some Seattle streets that have disappeared, but my old map also shows several streets that never even existed.

Seattle’s Magnolia neighborhood is a peninsula northwest of downtown. Per my 1950s era Kroll Map, Magnolia’s footprint was expected to balloon out several blocks into Elliott Bay and Puget Sound. My map shows that future fantasy expansion complete with streets names.

I’m not sure if they planned to wash away the Magnolia hillside (that’s what happened to Seattle’s Denny Regrade neighborhood) but whatever they were planning, all that remains is an old map showing the streets and avenues of a future that never happened.

The Tugboat Murder

img_5744I confess that I’m a picky reader, but I don’t think I’m alone.

To help folks decide whether or not they like the Elliott Bay Mysteries series, I’m including a freebie. The Tugboat Murder is only 15K words, so it’s somewhere between a short story and a novella. But it’s a single crime that’s solved over a single weekend (in 1950s Seattle, or course) so I’m calling it a “Mini-Mystery.”

My wonderful publisher, Barking Rain Press, is prepping it now and The Tugboat Murder should be available, totally free, on their website by the end of March.

Read what you love, especially if you love mysteries!

 

 

Seattle’s Ghost Streets

20170223_112510Seattle once had a neighborhood called Ross. As the city evolved, the name was lost, but my old map still shows streets overlapping the water. The Wedgewood Historical Society was nice enough to explain what happened:

When the Army Corps of Engineers built the Ballard Locks a 100 years ago (and the waterway which connects Lake Washington to Puget Sound) they dug out a few streets. The fun part is that my old 1950s Seattle map still shows those “ghost streets” in the water. Kinda spooky.